The Halls of Huntington

The Halls of Huntington

 

Shortly after Louis Turrin retired from Gradall Industries, he took a job as janitor for Reeves Banking & Trust Co., where his family had long done its banking. Following his career working for the New Philadelphia-based excavator manufacturer in northwest Ohio, he was committed to working hard well into his golden years.

Shortly after Louis Turrin retired from Gradall Industries, he took a job as janitor for Reeves Banking & Trust Co., where his family had long done its banking. Following his career working for the New Philadelphia-based excavator manufacturer in northwest Ohio, he was committed to working hard well into his golden years.

Louis’ daughter Rosemary Turrin Hall started as a teller at Reeves Bank in 1974. Her husband had become ill, and with three children at home she knew she had to start thinking about her family’s future.

“My father was very dependable,” she said, “and when I interviewed for the job, the bank president told me, ‘I’m hiring you because your dad was a hard worker and I know you will be too.’ That’s how I got the job.”1

After serving as a teller, Rosemary was promoted and spent two years processing commercial loans. Then she advanced to consumer compliance, the governing department that ensures that banks conform to equal-opportunity lending and employment standards. In 1982, Huntington acquired Reeves Bank and Rosemary was deployed to the Sugarcreek office as its assistant manager. She was soon promoted to manager and moved back to the New Philadelphia Auto Bank.

Rosemary later returned to consumer compliance, managing Huntington’s northeast Ohio community banks while taking on special projects including low-income housing initiatives and event planning. She finished her 30-year Huntington career back at the Sugarcreek branch as its manager. She retired in 2004.

Rosemary remembers fondly the opportunity that Huntington afforded her.

“Going from a small community bank to a larger bank like Huntington … I have to say that Huntington was truly an equal opportunity employer,” she said. “As I advanced in the corporation, I was paid fairly for what I did. … I was kind of the only female in middle management back in the early ’70s and ’80s.

“After Huntington came aboard there were a lot more women promoted, especially into management positions. … Huntington was always looking for women and people of diverse races. They were really at the forefront of that.”2

Rosemary’s job spurred her to look outside the bank to hire diverse candidates. But, as her father had, she jumped at the chance to bring her child into the fold.

After Rosemary’s son Matt finished his freshman year at The Ohio State University, Huntington offered a special summer employment program for employees’ children. Matt could also return to college in Columbus after this first summer gig. If he continued working at Huntington, the bank would help pay his OSU tuition.

“I loved that part of it,” Rosemary said.

Matt transferred to Huntington’s downtown Columbus branch and advanced from his teller position, becoming a teller trainer and supervisor and then moving to the sales side as a personal banker. He continued following in his mother’s footsteps, serving as an assistant manager and manager of several branches.

“In 1991, another tremendously influential woman gave me my first professional break,” he said. “My supervisor, Connie Orsak, promoted me to my first managerial position at Huntington.”3

In 1997, he headed to Detroit, where he served as district manager. In 2007, he ran the Pittsburgh region after the Sky Bank acquisition. In December 2012, he took an executive position as learning and development director.

“When I got into learning and development it was all about creating an experience that makes our people better in front of a customer or better in relation to another colleague. It’s all about helping people,” Matt said. “That’s what drives me, and what I like about my role.

“I enjoy preparing not only our leaders but also our colleagues to think about the future of banking, the future generations, the future of learning, and we’re at a really unique time with the five generations we have in the workplace today,” he added. “Thinking about what that means and how you help people be able to function through those environments and how you create learning mediums that will work across different generations, it’s really challenging and exciting.”

Matt and his two elder relatives have now combined to spend more than 60 years at Huntington.

“The reason my mom was here for 30 years,” he said, “and the reason I’ve stayed for 30 years is that the organization has always been great to me.”

Matt’s career support didn’t stop with his moves up the ladder. He came out as gay while at Huntington, when many other banks “weren’t really sure what to think. Huntington has always been supportive of me.”

From supporting women during their 1970s liberation push to supporting the LGBT community in recent generations, a welcoming atmosphere has always been a Huntington hallmark. Matt now works as a leader with Huntington’s LGBT affinity group.

Despite his tremendous success, Matt remains humble.

“I’m still trying to live up to my mom’s capabilities,” he said.

Rosemary said, “We’re very proud of him, and I know all his co-workers just love him to death because I hear it all the time when I go to Columbus. I see people that I worked with 20 years ago, and they remember me, but now they mainly know me as ‘Matt’s mom.’”4

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Matt and Rosemary Hall at Pelotonia. Photo Credit: Matt Hall