A business grows up, helped by a big bank with a local feel

A business grows up, helped by a big bank with a local feel

 

When Patrick Egan started his undertaking and livery business for transporting coffins to Columbus cemeteries in 1859, there was as yet no need for a funeral home. Funerals typically were held at the deceased’s home and involved only the immediate family.

When Patrick Egan started his undertaking and livery business for transporting coffins to Columbus cemeteries in 1859, there was as yet no need for a funeral home. Funerals typically were held at the deceased’s home and involved only the immediate family.

But there was a need for Egan to safeguard his business proceeds. So he opened an account at Columbus Savings Bank, near the corner of High and Goodale streets. He or a trusted employee would walk the few blocks from his stables at 30 W. Naghten St., near the present-day site of Nationwide Arena, to make a deposit. His son Michael Egan would later serve for several years on the bank’s board.1

As traditions evolved over the decades and more funerals were held in commercial buildings designed for that purpose, the family livery enterprise developed into today’s Egan-Ryan Funeral Home. In 1929, the business moved to 403 Broad St. and added “Ryan” to its name. The original stables and buildings no longer stand, but some traditions remain. Egan-Ryan President Bob Ryan recalls walking in his great-grandfather’s footsteps. As a young member of the family-owned-and-operated business, he took his turn delivering the deposits to the bank, which Huntington Bank acquired in 1963.2

Fifth-generation family member Kevin, Bob’s son, may no longer physically deliver deposits at Huntington’s building, but the banking relationship continues to thrive. Egan-Ryan is considered Huntington’s fourth-oldest banking client.3

Huntington helped finance the addition of a chapel on Columbus’ east side in 1991. Tapping a broad range of Huntington banking services, the business continued to expand to meet the community’s needs and added a third chapel on the city’s northwest side in 2009.

“We worked with another bank for a while,” Ryan said. “We noticed the difference and came back. It’s nice to have a working relationship as an appreciated customer. (Huntington) fits our needs. They are a big bank, but also a local bank.”4

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When Patrick Egan started his undertaking and livery business for transporting coffins to Columbus cemeteries in 1859, there was as yet no need for a funeral home. But as traditions evolved, so did Egan’s business. Photo Credit: Egan-Ryan

Copy of Egan-ryan founder - website

Founder Patrick Egan began banking with Columbus Savings Bank, a Huntington Bank acquisition, in 1859. Photo Credit: Egan-Ryan