A Seamless Fit

While the origins of FirstMerit parallel those of Huntington, the recent past of the two banks reflects just as many similarities. “Banks that have been headquartered in the Midwest for a long time really have significant histories and close attachments...

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Midwest Bank

In 1959, suburbs across the country were growing rapidly, and the area outside of Chicago called Elmwood Park was no exception. Incorporated in 1914, the village had its first big growth spurt in the 1920s when planned neighborhoods as well...

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A Banking Beacon in Flint

Enter downtown Flint, Michigan, and one of the first things to catch your eye will be a large glowing sphere atop the building at 328 S. Saginaw St. This 2.5-ton Plexiglas ball corresponds to National Weather Service forecasts and its...

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What’s in a Name: The History of The First National Bank of Akron

In many ways, the stories compiled during Huntington Bank’s 150th anniversary campaign have been stories of consistency and continuity. In an industry like banking, however, change is often just as dominant a theme. The early days of some financial institutions...

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Consistency Amid Change

During times of transition, continuity is key. Just as Huntington Bank appreciates colleagues with an impressive legacy of service, the newly acquired FirstMerit shares that same respect for tenure and experience. It’s not simply that colleagues stick around for decades—what’s...

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Opportunity Out of Fire

A master of opportunity, firm in his beliefs and tough to keep down, Harrison Gray (H.G.) Blake often resembled the namesake of the bank he founded, Phoenix Bank—one of the oldest predecessor institutions of what became FirstMerit Bank, now part...

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Esprit de corps in dedication to core values

Accountability. Communication. Continuous Improvement. Inclusion. Passion. Service. Teamwork.

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Man on a Mission

It was a job interview unlike any other in Huntington’s history. Mike Fezzey wasn’t looking for a position. And at least initially, none of the bank executives in the room saw him as a candidate.

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Question for a new generation of Huntington bankers: “Where are the canned tomatoes?”

Beginning in the mid-1980s and into the 1990s, banks saw in-store branches as a cost-effective way to expand beyond brick-and-mortar locations and serve a too-much-to-do-and-too-little-time-to-do-it generation of customers.

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Growing from the outside In

An unprecedented wave of deregulation rewrote the banking industry’s rule book beginning in the early 1970s. And to seize the opportunities created, Huntington Bank broke with tradition, picking a president unlike any other in its history.

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The Halls of Huntington

Shortly after Louis Turrin retired from Gradall Industries, he took a job as janitor for Reeves Banking & Trust Co., where his family had long done its banking. Following his career working for the New Philadelphia-based excavator manufacturer in northwest...

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Four men, two generations, one enduring institution

The father starts the business and eventually the son steps up to succeed him. It’s the storyline behind generations of American economic growth and expansion, from the earliest farmsteads to modern industry. The Huntington story is that plot, tripled: P.W....

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The boilermaker brings success to a simmer

In certain company, a boilermaker is a shot and a beer. In other crowds, the word is synonymous with Indiana’s Purdue University, its school mascot being a “Boilermaker Special” locomotive. But the word’s origins refer to skilled craftsmen, and the...

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Saying “Welcome,” 600,000 ways every month

On a typical day, a typical Huntington phone bank colleague will field 80 to 100 customer service calls, answering questions simple — “What’s my balance?” — and dizzyingly complex — “Can you explain these financial instruments or business accounts?” Anthony...

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A long, prosperous partnership

As Huntington Bank celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2016, it will also mark another milestone — the 125th anniversary of working closely with Porter, Wright, Morris & Arthur, central Ohio’s oldest law firm and the region’s oldest continuing business. Neither...

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For family, all roads lead to success

George Byers & Sons has been meeting Columbus’ transportation needs for more than a century. It began back when locals turned to then-named Blue Ribbon Livery Stable for “renting horses for funerals, weddings or just for a Sunday ride,” according...

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A large institution with a local feel

“Like many natural gas companies,” Richard Hallett said, “we went through quite an evolution over the course of one hundred years, particularly in our geographical area of northwest Ohio.”

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A success story powered by family

Decades before he launched Green Biologics, Thomas Grote understood family business. Tom’s father, Jim, founded Donatos Pizza in 1963. Tom was born in 1964.

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Pizzas, and business plans, with everything

Jim Grote’s father, the youngest of five children, and his uncle owned a grocery store on Columbus’ north side. Though the shop never made much money, Jim always looked up to his father and wanted to be part of what...

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One family, stewarding generations of growth

Robert “Bob” G. Meeuwsen may have been just 21 years old when he started Meeuwsen Produce in 1950, but he had an idea for a small business that could meet a community need and provide for his family. For more...

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Savvy adviser leads a surge

Huntington Bank’s considerable success in northwest Ohio begins and ends with its willingness to “have a local banker see a loan through, from start to finish,” second-generation real estate industry client and former Huntington director Jerry Sawicki III said.

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A business grows up, helped by a big bank with a local feel

When Patrick Egan started his undertaking and livery business for transporting coffins to Columbus cemeteries in 1859, there was as yet no need for a funeral home. Funerals typically were held at the deceased’s home and involved only the immediate...

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Oven-baked partnership began with bread

The Italian branch of the Orlando family is happy baking bread out of the same bakery back in Castel di Sangro, southeast of Rome, that it opened in 1872. When Vincenzo and Giuseppe (Joe), two of founder Giustino’s six sons,...

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Sports and Safety

“Own my own business.” “Be my own boss.” “Do my own thing.”

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Parallel paths, powerful perspectives

“Take two steps back. Turn right. Take two more steps back. Now look back at where you were. From this broader point of view, what can you see now that you couldn’t see before?”

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The Prouds’ point of pride

There are manufacturers and then there are manufacturers of manufacturers — companies that build the things that build more things. Proud Co. is one such high-tech manufacturer of industrial automated services — think assembly-line robotics, motion controllers, industrial hardware and...

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Midwestern Workers at a Crossroads

By the latter years of the 19th century, workers were flocking to America’s cities, including those in the rapidly growing Midwest. They wanted to make a new life for themselves and their families. Advances in transportation and industry attracted America’s...

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Family tree spawns construction company with deep community roots

What bank wouldn’t want to lend to the Ratner family and the renowned, multibillion-dollar real estate empire it built, Forest City Realty Trust, Inc.? It seems a crazy question, but the Ratners were far from a sure thing when they...

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Compassionately caring for the most vulnerable

Food, water, shelter, safety — these are critical needs for human bodies. Care, purpose, compassion and love — these are necessities for human spirits. And for more than 160 years, Children’s Bureau has helped to meet all of these needs...

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When life gives you lemons, build entrepreneurship

Some of the young entrepreneurs most vital to southeast Michigan’s long-term prosperity aren’t working in the automotive industry or Web development or advanced manufacturing technology.

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Covering the bases in economic development

The man who patrolled right field for the Columbus Capitals in the 1860s, one of the city’s first amateur baseball teams, was tall and powerful and looked as if he could drive the ball a mile. But he was a...

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Moving the chains: making progress in western Pennsylvania

In football country, loyalties run deep and the people alongside you matter. It was fitting, then, that when Huntington introduced itself to the Pittsburgh market and surrounding region, the bank was mindful of whom it chose as teammates.

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Housing for Seniors

Madison Square Apartments in Grand Rapids were built in the 1980s and designed as affordable housing for seniors and disabled people. By the late 2000s, the 60-unit complex was run-down, ragged and desperately needed renovation. Nevertheless, many residents stayed, because...

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It’s not just a ride, it’s a movement

On the corner of South Third and Rich streets in downtown Columbus, a sea of green-jerseyed riders rolls bikes to the starting line. Twenty-five miles away, Huntington volunteers prepare peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and cups of water at Pickerington...

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A gridiron game plan

On a late summer night in 1920, a group of men met in the showroom of Ralph Hay’s Jordan and Hupmobile auto dealership in Canton, Ohio. Because Hay didn’t have enough chairs, some of the visitors, including a Chicagoan named...

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Building stronger communities, board by board

On Sunday afternoons in the years following P.W. Huntington & Co.’s creation, the bank president’s horse and buggy would stop twice on its route. The first stop was the bank; the second was Green Lawn Cemetery’s offices. P.W., a cemetery...

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Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership


Homeownership is only a dream for some Americans. They don’t qualify for a traditional mortgage and can’t find alternative financing. Others are losing their grip on homeownership. Maintenance and utilities costs are prohibitive, or difficult circumstances arise to make mortgage...

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The art of banking

P.W. Huntington’s last will and testament begins with legalese. Item 1 revokes previous wills. Item 2 directs executors to pay any of his debts (there were none, befitting his lifelong devotion to fiscal prudence).

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A different way to plant the seeds of success

Making capital available to individuals and businesses is one way a bank can nurture a community’s vitality. But as Huntington’s Seeds for Growth workshop has shown, it’s hardly the only one.

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Financial lessons, mastered early

Give youth the chance to learn by doing. This simple principle sparked the founding of Junior Achievement in 1919 by AT&T President Theodore Vail, Strathmore Paper President Horace Moses and U.S. Sen. Murray Crane, R- Mass.

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Bank helps theater troupe succeed at every stage

“The opening night of ‘Mrs. Bob Cratchit’s Wild Christmas Binge’ by in 2002 was one for the books,” said Tracy Bridgen, artistic director of the City Theatre Company of Pittsburgh, an arts nonprofit and Huntington customer.

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Charting a community’s course to financial empowerment

It’s not unusual these days for banks to invite their customers to a financial education workshop — Banking 101, if you will. Since 2001, banks have led more than 3 million consumers through a Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.-created program called Money Smart.

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Investing in a generation, and generations to follow

Banking is a relationship business. And Crystal Faulkner, partner in the Cincinnati accounting company she started with her husband 16 years ago, appreciates the value Huntington National Bank attaches to relationships, even when they’re with classrooms full of fourth-graders.

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Together we stand stronger

By working together, people can achieve the greatest good for their communities. It’s a simple idea that can have a massive impact.

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Blurring party lines to build an empire

The bond between West Virginia industrialist and politician Henry Gassaway Davis and his son-in-law Stephen B. Elkins withstood three decades of partnership in many businesses and philanthropic endeavors, including the Elkins Bank and the college that still bears their names.

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Mr. Den Herder goes to Washington

When young Jacob Den Herder and his family, newly arrived from the Netherlands in 1847, stepped off the flatboat that had carried them into western Michigan, they were greeted by thousands of acres of dense forest.

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Helping build futures for the men who built the railroads

On paydays at the Indianapolis Union Railway Co. in the 1880s, railroad men would queue up outside an office on Union Station’s second floor to receive pay envelopes from paymaster William Taylor Cannon.

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Longtime colleagues, lasting legacy

Huntington’s culture continues to recognize and foster longevity of service. An impressive list of colleagues are entering their third, fourth or fifth decades of service.

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A banking career built on community

Huntington’s story is rooted in community banking. And community banking’s history in Columbus, Ohio, is rooted in David Deshler’s life and career.

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P.W. Huntington: Adventurer, leader, banker

Nearly 50 years before two bicycle mechanics piloted their “air machine” over the beach at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, Pelatiah Webster Huntington experienced air travel for himself.

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